Grown And Certified on Display at Tourism Centers Across NYS

New York State “Grown and Certified” Christmas trees and wreaths will be on display in the state’s regional welcome centers and Taste NY stores, promoting New York’s agricultural and tourism industries.

New York’s Christmas tree industry sells nearly 300,000 trees from more than 750 tree farms located across the state.

The NYS Grown & Certified program tells buyers the products they are selecting come from farmers who grow their products in an environmentally-responsible manner.

NYS Grown & Certified participating tree farm producers in Wayne County are:

Brick Church Farms Christmas Trees and Gift Shop
5502 S. Geneva Rd.
Sodus, New York
(315) 483-9876

Franke Farms
3700 Boss Road Extension
Marion, NY
(315) 986-1349

New York State’s agriculture industry is one of our great assets and keeping it growing and thriving is one of the most important things we can do. When you see products with the New York State Grown & Certified seal, you are assured that it comes from a local farm that adheres to high food safety standards and environmentally responsible practices.

To learn more about the NYS Grown and Certified program contact Ian Priestley AEM Specialist at 315-946-7200 or email: Ian@wayneNYswcd.org

Funding Provided for Agricultural Projects that Help Farmers Address Water Quality Challenges in Wayne County and across NYS

This week Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced that $16.2 million has been awarded to support agricultural water quality conservation projects across the state.

As part of the funds awarded, Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District will receive $95,105.00 to provide assistance to three farms to address erosion and phosphorus export, stormwater control and green infrastructure improvements to roofs and gutter systems to direct stormwater away from sensitive areas. Since the inception of the Ag Non-Point program, WCSWCD has assisted over 40 farms with the implementation of best management practices. These BMPs have had a direct effect on potential pollutants from entering the waterways and provide substantial water quality improvements to the watersheds of Wayne County.

All projects support the New York State Agricultural Environmental Management (AEM) Program by funding the implementation of agricultural water quality Best Management Practices (BMPs) to protect natural resources while maintaining the economic viability of New York State’s diverse agricultural community. In total, more than 90 farms will benefit from the Agricultural Nonpoint Source Abatement and Control Program. For a complete list of projects awarded, please visit the Department of Agriculture website.

“New York is a leader in the fight to protect clean water, preserve agriculture for the future and combat climate change,” Governor Cuomo said. “From our aggressive clean energy plan to environmentally responsible farm practices, we are committed to supporting projects that will protect our natural resources and ensure a better future for the next generation. This program, which paved the way for many of our other on-farm environmental protection programs, continues to help our farmers use cost-effective methods to protect our waterways.”

The New York Department of Agriculture and Markets administers the Agricultural Nonpoint Source Abatement and Control Program in coordination with the New York State Soil and Water Conservation Committee. The program is a part of the Agricultural Environmental Management framework, a broader effort that helps farmers achieve higher levels of environmental stewardship and more efficient, cost-effective farming systems.

Through the Agricultural Nonpoint Source Abatement and Control Program in coordination with the New York State Soil and Water Conservation Committee projects include best management practice systems to keep nutrients and other potential pollutants from entering waterways. BMPs include a variety of measures including, vegetative buffers along streams, cover crops, nutrient management through manure storage, and other conservation measures.

The Agricultural Nonpoint Source Abatement and Control Program is funded in the 2018-19 State Budget through the historic $300 million New York State Environmental Protection Fund. Since 1993, New York State has dedicated approximately $210 million to the program.

The Agricultural Nonpoint Source Abatement and Control Program builds on the Governor’s efforts to provide historic water quality protections across the state through the $2.5 billion Clean Water Infrastructure Act of 2017. In 2019, the New York State budget also committed an additional $500 million for capital costs of clean water infrastructure projects.

Following Governor Cuomo’s 2018 State of the State announcement, state agencies allocated more than $82 million in competitive grants for projects to address nutrient pollution in water bodies that have been affected by harmful algal blooms. For more information visit https://www.agriculture.ny.gov/

 

 

Are you in an Ag District? Do you need a Soil Group Worksheet?

The agricultural assessment program allows eligible farmland owners to receive real property assessments based on the value of their land for agricultural production rather than on its development value.  Any assessed value which exceeds the equalized agricultural assessment on the land may qualify for a reduced tax assessment.

Landowners must apply through the local town assessor for an agricultural assessment. Further Information on Agricultural Districts can be found here, contact information for local assessors can be found here.

Do you qualify? Find out by visiting the Soil Group page, there you can find more information about the program and will be able to download a brochure. You may also call our office at 315-946-7200

Take action to stop spotted lanternfly by reporting tree-of-heaven in New York State!

Spotted lanternfly (SLF) feed on many different tree species but are particularly attracted to an invasive tree species known as tree-of-heaven). Any SLF that make their way to New York will be drawn to tree-of-heaven – and they will not stop there. They will next move to feed on native and economically valuable New York plant species, such as maple trees, apple trees, hops, grapes, poplar species, and many others.

This is where you come in: report any tree-of-heaven that you see across New York, and we will be able to watch for and locate SLF more easily!

You can record data on invasive species right from your smartphone by using iMapInvasives, (https://www.imapinvasives.org/) New York’s invasive species database, available for iOS and Android.

Visit:

https://www.nyimapinvasives.org/calendar-of-events   to learn more about the app or to find a training hosted by your local Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (PRISM).

 

Photo Credit NYS Ag and Markets / USDA APHIS

Tree of Heaven

If you think you’ve seen the Spotted Lantern Fly, send photos and location info to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov, or fill out an online report: https://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/116595.html

How can your business help?

NYS Department of Environmental Conservation

Spotted Lantern Fly Fact Sheet

Penn State Spotted Lanternfly Management for Homeowners

 

 

Humbert Farms named Wayne County 2019 Conservation Farm of the Year.

Pictured: Mark Humbert, Senator Pam Helming, Jacob Flowers, Ethan Humbert, Steve Olson, Assemblyman Brian Manktelow, District Manager Lindsey Gerstenslager and Conservation Field Manager of Wayne County AEM programs, Ron Thorn

2019 Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District’s Conservation Farm of the Year has been awarded to Humbert Farms because of their dedication and commitment to protect and conserve the natural resources within our community through the New York State Agricultural Environmental Management Program.

The family-run farm is located in the Town of Rose on Lakes Corners -Rose Valley consisting of 3400 acres of owned/rented property with the majority of the commodity in field crops.

The Humbert family, Mark, and son Ethan have participated in the implementation of several farm management projects to keep their farm on the forefront of conservation; working with neighboring farms to carry out crop rotation, crop cover, manure sharing, natural resource sharing, irrigation, and best management practices implementation. The farm utilizes minimal tillage conservation systems, green fertilization techniques, conservation crop cover for year-round protection of soil erosion and is consistently working to minimize their impact on central Erie Canal system and Greater Sodus Bay. These BMPs limit damage to the aquatic life and protect recreational uses of streams and waterways they flow into, providing community sustainability for the future.

The Humbert family has worked to update their Certified Nutrient Management Plan in an effort to help guide the farm for management of rotation of crops, effective manure application for crop production and management of other natural resources. They work in partnership with the USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service, USDA Farm Service Agency and the Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District to further the benefits of land stewardship and conservation implementation, by managing their farm and providing a higher quality commodity while looking out for the health of the environment.

“The Humbert family exemplifies what good agricultural environmental management is to Wayne County and New York State, by their continued efforts to participate, demonstrate and educate local area farmers community members and leadership, says Lindsey Gertenslager, District Manager Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District. “They continue to inspire all agricultural entities with a ‘Can-Do’ attitude, which leads to new opportunities for everyone.

Patricia VanLare — 2019 Wayne County Agricultural Environmental Steward Recipient

LYONS NY- Patricia (Pat) VanLare of Sodus N.Y, has been awarded the 2019 Wayne County Agricultural Environmental Steward award. The award was created at a grassroots level to recognize individuals that strengthen the Wayne County agriculture community while looking out for environmental sustainability. An agricultural steward is someone who is dedicated to being agriculturally minded, environmental and conversationally sound and having the balance for them both economically.

Pat VanLare has supported agriculture through her personal work, serving as a community advocate for local and sustainable family traditions and local environmental related issues in Wayne County. She supports local programs that educate people where what and how food reaches farm to table, NYS Envirothon and Sodus Central Schools as a home economics instructor. She has been an active participant in the Wayne County Pomona Grange, serving at the State and Regional Grange levels and a Board Member of the NYS Grange Museum for many years. Pat serves on the Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District’s Board of Directors as Vice-President and sits on the Wayne County’s County Fair Advisory Board as a volunteer coordinator.

Pat’s continued effort helps to improve Wayne County’s ties to agriculture and the importance of family, local traditions, history and agricultural advocacy for food production, land stewardship and environmental issues. Her working knowledge of several agricultural organizations such as Farm Bureau, Grange, Soil and Water, and USDA help provide information to the local communities to help them address advocacy on a consistent and uniformed message.

“I have worked on the District Board of Directors with Pat and cannot think of a better recipient to receive this honor,” said Huron Town Supervisor Laurie Crane who was recently the recipient of the New York State Senate Helming’s Woman of Distinction award.

We honor Pat as the 2019 Wayne County Agriculture Environmental Stewardship recipient because of her dedication and continue the passion for leading the Wayne County Agricultural Community into the future. Thank you, Pat, congratulations!

Wayne County Youth Derby a Win for Big and Small

Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District and the Wayne County Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs awarded trophies and prizes to over 50 youth anglers at the Wayne County Youth Fishing Derby (YFD) awards ceremony held earlier this month.

The fishing derby had over 55 youth angler participants from ages 4-16. Anglers could register fish at bait and tackle shops and marinas around Wayne County. The Derby had three separate contests in one. Trophies and plaques were sponsored by McDonalds of Wayne County and presented by owner, Nancy Wilkes.
The prizes awarded to anglers ages 7-16 are for 1st thru 6th place in the Species Challenge; Largemouth and Smallmouth Bass, Northern Pike, Walleye and Perch. Noah Wazinski won the Merchant’s Challenge. Noah had to land one of each species for a grand slam; in speaking to Noah’s Dad and the weigh-in stations, he (Noah) fished just about every day!

In the Al Shultz Memorial Challenge, Jillian Thomas and Login Smith were winners. Both under the age 7. They both registered Blue Gill, Rock Bass, Sunfish and Perch to take home trophies. New this year was the “Captain’ Larry award given to the youngest angler Alexander De George of Williamson, age 4. Larry LaForce, a dedicated member of Wayne Co. Federation of Sportsmen, passed away unexpectedly in 2018. Larry loved everything fishing and was an active volunteer every year at the awards event. In addition, the “Most Dedicated Angler” award went to Jaelyn Knapp. The final scores are available click here

Special thank you to all of the sponsors and donors who put big smiles on the faces of the youth anglers in Wayne County. McDonald’s of Wayne County supplies the trophy awards every year. The Rotary of Sodus sponsored 18 youth from the Village of Sodus Point summer recreation program. Most of the program participants had never fished before the event and learned how to put bait on a hook and the practice of catch and release. Walt Crum thrilled the crowd with his imaginative balloon creations. Paton’s Marketplace supplied everything on the grill and the Sodus Point Fire Department for the venue. B&E Tackle, Chill and Grill, Davenport’s Tackle, Finger Lakes Prism, Lake County Taxidermy, Lyons National Bank and Wayne County Tourism donated baskets for the raffle.

Without the support of the following generous sponsors, this annual event would not have taken place. They include: Arney’s Marina, Bay Bridge Sport’s Shop, B&E Tackle, Captain Jack’s, Davenport and Sons Livery and Marina, Zip N Zim Sportfishing, Fishin Magician Sportfishing, Port Bay RV Park and Campground, Hughes Marina, Krenzer Marine, Clingerman Taxidermy, Dynalac Corporation, Steger Haus Restaurant, Joey’s Northside Grocery and Ely & Leene Insurance Agency.

The Wayne County Federation of Sportsmen and the Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District are looking forward to the 2020 event.

If you are interested in sponsorship, please contact the District 315-946-7200.

 

Lake Ontario Inundation Mapping Tools Now Available from New York Sea Grant

Press Release: June 6, 2019

NY Seagrant

Lake Ontario Inundation Mapping Tools Now Available from New York Sea Grant: Tutorial Webinar Planned for June 20

Newark, N.Y.; June 6, 2019. New York Sea Grant, with funding from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has developed new interactive inundation mapping tools to help property owners along Lake Ontario and its embayments enhance flooding preparedness.

The tools are posted at https://protect2.fireeye.com/url?k=d22862f1-8e10c593-d22a9bc4-000babd9f75c-7977e1b7e4b2309e&u=https://seagrant.sunysb.edu/articles/r/12972 with a tutorial to assist users. A free, 45-minute training webinar is scheduled for June 20th at 1 p.m.; register at https://cornell.zoom.us/meeting/register/250965bd69e1e22e7c24e00bf0acd2b8.

The online mapping tools provide users with a parcel-level view of areas that could experience flooding along Lake Ontario and its embayments based on predetermined water levels and digital elevation data. Wayne and Monroe County stakeholders beta-tested the new tools. The future scenarios used in the mapping tools are not water levels currently projected, but potential lake levels offered for planning purposes only.

“These new mapping tools will allow users to visualize inundation information for individual parcels of interest using the predetermined water levels. That information can be used by individual property owners as well as communities to enhance flood preparedness and planning going forward,” said project leader and New York Sea Grant Coastal Community Development Specialist Mary Austerman, Newark, N.Y.

Use of the mapping tools has been designed to assist planning, e.g., location and triage of accessory structures and belongings during high water, to inform community-level preparedness planning, and to help identify areas that warrant in-depth analyses, enhanced flood response, or policy development to enhance flood resilience.

Austerman and Jessica Kuonen, a Coastal Community Development Assistant with New York Sea Grant, are the developers of the Lake Ontario Inundation Map Package and Lake Ontario Inundation WebMap tools. These new mapping tools were developed as part of a larger project creating a Coastal Resiliency Index, due out later this year. A similar mapping tool for Lake Erie is being explored. For more information, contact Mary Austerman, New York Sea Grant, 315-331-8415 x121, mp357@cornell.edu.

For additional information on New York Sea Grant’s Great Lakes Coastal Communities extension efforts, visit https://protect2.fireeye.com/url?k=d28b6aaa-8eb3cdc8-d289939f-000babd9f75c-d42de83103875b27&u=http://www.nyseagrant.org/ccd. To learn more about New York Sea Grant Extension as a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration cooperative program of Cornell University and the State University of New York, visit https://protect2.fireeye.com/url?k=c6863400-9abe9362-c684cd35-000babd9f75c-3c09bd9ada5a4e99&u=http://www.nyseagrant.org/.

MEDIA CONTACTS:
. Mary Austerman, New York Sea Grant, 315-331-8415 x121, mp357@cornell.edu
. Publicist Kara Lynn Dunn, 315-465-7578, karalynn@gisco.net

https://protect2.fireeye.com/url?k=586fc42d-0457634f-586d3d18-000babd9f75c-b3de3852ea766f4f&u=https://seagrant.sunysb.edu/articles/r/12973

North Rose Wolcott High School Takes 1st place in 2019 Wayne County Envirothon

Congratulations to the North Rose Wolcott High School team for taking first place in the 2019 Wayne County Envirothon. The team was led by teacher and environmental enthusiast Mr. Nick Wojieck. The team members included:  Bella DeFeo, Lucy Zhang, Shea Shattuck, Kennedy Jones, Phil Ufholz, and Jacob Smith. This was the third year North-Rose Wolcott had competed.

This year, the Montezuma Audubon Center in Savannah N.Y. hosted the seven teams. Students competed from four high schools across the Wayne County that included: Wayne Central High School, North Rose-Wolcott HS, Red Creek High School and Wayne Technical and Career Center.

Second place was awarded Red Creek led by their teacher Mr. Terry Elmer, Third Place was awarded to the Red Creek Rams, led by their teacher Mr. Joseph Bonanno with a brand new team for 2019.

After years of rain and snow during past Envirothon competitions, this year was a bright and sunny day at the Montezuma Wildlife Center. Each team consisted of three to five-members. The teams participated in a series of field station tests that focus on five topic areas of conservation– soils and land use, aquatic ecology, forestry, wildlife, a current environmental issue, this year being Agriculture and the Environment: Knowledge and Technology to Feed the World.

In addition to the five field stations, each team must present their solution to a problem related to the current issue to a board of judges.  The population of the Earth is estimated to be approximately 9 billion by the year 2050. One of the primary concerns for the agricultural industry is how will farmers be able to grow enough food to feed this growing population, while also protecting natural resources such as soil, water, air, wildlife, and forestry resources.  Students gave presentations on the concepts of how agriculture and all natural resource areas are interrelated, and how the use of new technologies are key to increase food production. Key topics included:

Understand the importance of moving toward sustainable farming systems to conserve natural resources, mitigate climate change, reduce erosion and protect water quality and quantity, and promote pollination;

Comprehension of farming practices that build soil organic matter such as composting, crop rotations, cover crops, conservation tillage, and management intensive grazing systems to improve soil health;

Understand integrated pest management and biological pest control techniques used to prevent insect pest, disease, and weed problems;

Understand the role of new technology: agricultural biotechnology; precision agriculture; and using UAV (drones, GIS, etc.) to increase farm efficiency for food production.

Envirothon is designed to give students the opportunity to learn about environmental issues and natural resources by conducting tests in the field. Often times this experience becomes a lifestyle for students and goes beyond competitions—it encourages students to be actively engaged in the environment around them at all times. Many students move onto careers in the conservation and environmental fields.

The District couldn’t put on a successful youth conservation program without our many sponsors. Special thanks go to the area businesses that made donations. Their support assisted in the purchase of Envirothon T-shirts, educational prizes and awards. Area sponsors included Wayne Pomona Grange, Lyons National Bank, Lyons Veterinary Clinic, Galens Pharmacy, RoadTek LLC, Wayne County Farm Bureau, Wegmans Newark, Thorpe Vineyard, and Clingerman Taxidermy.  In addition, recognition goes to Montezuma Audubon Center Director Chris Lajewski and the many volunteers at the Center that assisted in the event.

The North Rose Wolcott team will move on to compete at N.Y. State competition held at the Hobart & William Smith Colleges in Geneva, NY on May 22 & 23rd. Good luck and GO TEAM!

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Spring Fish Sale is Underway – Stock your ponds!

Our Spring fish sale is underway.  This year we are offering Flathead minnows, Largemouth Bass, Blue Gill, Catfish, and Black Crappie.  Orders with payment due by Thursday, April 25, 2019

Sterilized Triploid Grass Carp are also available to control aquatic vegetation. 

Sterilized carp that are incapable of producing viable young, is the only form of grass carp legal in NY due to concerns of the potential impact fertile grass carp could have on the ecosystem. Grass carp prefer submergent, tender plant species such as elodea, coontail, fanwort, curly leaf pondweed, and watermilfoil. They will not control emergent plants such as cattail, bulrush or floating plant species such as water lily.

Please include a copy of the approved DEC permit with order

A DEC permit is required before you can buy and stock grass carp in your pond. The permit form is available from the NYS DEC at http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/wildlife_pdf/grasscarpstockap.pdf, or you can call our office and we can mail a copy. The permit should be completed and sent to DEC at least three weeks before our sale to ensure you receive your permit before our deadline.

How to Order

1. Order through our online store (click here)

2. Print and mail a check (click here)

3. Call 315-946-7200 and order by phone

This year pickup will be at our NEW LOCATION 7312 RT 31 Lyons, NY 14489 (just behind the Sheriff Offices.) Thursday May 2nd – 5-6 P.M.

When picking up your fish pond owners should bring their own transport containers. Call Chris at 315-946-7200 with any questions.

Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District
7312 RT 31 Lyons, NY 14489
315-946-7200