Wayne County Youth Derby a Win for Big and Small

Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District and the Wayne County Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs awarded trophies and prizes to over 50 youth anglers at the Wayne County Youth Fishing Derby (YFD) awards ceremony held earlier this month.

The fishing derby had over 55 youth angler participants from ages 4-16. Anglers could register fish at bait and tackle shops and marinas around Wayne County. The Derby had three separate contests in one. Trophies and plaques were sponsored by McDonalds of Wayne County and presented by owner, Nancy Wilkes.
The prizes awarded to anglers ages 7-16 are for 1st thru 6th place in the Species Challenge; Largemouth and Smallmouth Bass, Northern Pike, Walleye and Perch. Noah Wazinski won the Merchant’s Challenge. Noah had to land one of each species for a grand slam; in speaking to Noah’s Dad and the weigh-in stations, he (Noah) fished just about every day!

In the Al Shultz Memorial Challenge, Jillian Thomas and Login Smith were winners. Both under the age 7. They both registered Blue Gill, Rock Bass, Sunfish and Perch to take home trophies. New this year was the “Captain’ Larry award given to the youngest angler Alexander De George of Williamson, age 4. Larry LaForce, a dedicated member of Wayne Co. Federation of Sportsmen, passed away unexpectedly in 2018. Larry loved everything fishing and was an active volunteer every year at the awards event. In addition, the “Most Dedicated Angler” award went to Jaelyn Knapp. The final scores are available click here

Special thank you to all of the sponsors and donors who put big smiles on the faces of the youth anglers in Wayne County. McDonald’s of Wayne County supplies the trophy awards every year. The Rotary of Sodus sponsored 18 youth from the Village of Sodus Point summer recreation program. Most of the program participants had never fished before the event and learned how to put bait on a hook and the practice of catch and release. Walt Crum thrilled the crowd with his imaginative balloon creations. Paton’s Marketplace supplied everything on the grill and the Sodus Point Fire Department for the venue. B&E Tackle, Chill and Grill, Davenport’s Tackle, Finger Lakes Prism, Lake County Taxidermy, Lyons National Bank and Wayne County Tourism donated baskets for the raffle.

Without the support of the following generous sponsors, this annual event would not have taken place. They include: Arney’s Marina, Bay Bridge Sport’s Shop, B&E Tackle, Captain Jack’s, Davenport and Sons Livery and Marina, Zip N Zim Sportfishing, Fishin Magician Sportfishing, Port Bay RV Park and Campground, Hughes Marina, Krenzer Marine, Clingerman Taxidermy, Dynalac Corporation, Steger Haus Restaurant, Joey’s Northside Grocery and Ely & Leene Insurance Agency.

The Wayne County Federation of Sportsmen and the Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District are looking forward to the 2020 event.

If you are interested in sponsorship, please contact the District 315-946-7200.

 

Lake Ontario Inundation Mapping Tools Now Available from New York Sea Grant

Press Release: June 6, 2019

NY Seagrant

Lake Ontario Inundation Mapping Tools Now Available from New York Sea Grant: Tutorial Webinar Planned for June 20

Newark, N.Y.; June 6, 2019. New York Sea Grant, with funding from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has developed new interactive inundation mapping tools to help property owners along Lake Ontario and its embayments enhance flooding preparedness.

The tools are posted at https://protect2.fireeye.com/url?k=d22862f1-8e10c593-d22a9bc4-000babd9f75c-7977e1b7e4b2309e&u=https://seagrant.sunysb.edu/articles/r/12972 with a tutorial to assist users. A free, 45-minute training webinar is scheduled for June 20th at 1 p.m.; register at https://cornell.zoom.us/meeting/register/250965bd69e1e22e7c24e00bf0acd2b8.

The online mapping tools provide users with a parcel-level view of areas that could experience flooding along Lake Ontario and its embayments based on predetermined water levels and digital elevation data. Wayne and Monroe County stakeholders beta-tested the new tools. The future scenarios used in the mapping tools are not water levels currently projected, but potential lake levels offered for planning purposes only.

“These new mapping tools will allow users to visualize inundation information for individual parcels of interest using the predetermined water levels. That information can be used by individual property owners as well as communities to enhance flood preparedness and planning going forward,” said project leader and New York Sea Grant Coastal Community Development Specialist Mary Austerman, Newark, N.Y.

Use of the mapping tools has been designed to assist planning, e.g., location and triage of accessory structures and belongings during high water, to inform community-level preparedness planning, and to help identify areas that warrant in-depth analyses, enhanced flood response, or policy development to enhance flood resilience.

Austerman and Jessica Kuonen, a Coastal Community Development Assistant with New York Sea Grant, are the developers of the Lake Ontario Inundation Map Package and Lake Ontario Inundation WebMap tools. These new mapping tools were developed as part of a larger project creating a Coastal Resiliency Index, due out later this year. A similar mapping tool for Lake Erie is being explored. For more information, contact Mary Austerman, New York Sea Grant, 315-331-8415 x121, mp357@cornell.edu.

For additional information on New York Sea Grant’s Great Lakes Coastal Communities extension efforts, visit https://protect2.fireeye.com/url?k=d28b6aaa-8eb3cdc8-d289939f-000babd9f75c-d42de83103875b27&u=http://www.nyseagrant.org/ccd. To learn more about New York Sea Grant Extension as a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration cooperative program of Cornell University and the State University of New York, visit https://protect2.fireeye.com/url?k=c6863400-9abe9362-c684cd35-000babd9f75c-3c09bd9ada5a4e99&u=http://www.nyseagrant.org/.

MEDIA CONTACTS:
. Mary Austerman, New York Sea Grant, 315-331-8415 x121, mp357@cornell.edu
. Publicist Kara Lynn Dunn, 315-465-7578, karalynn@gisco.net

https://protect2.fireeye.com/url?k=586fc42d-0457634f-586d3d18-000babd9f75c-b3de3852ea766f4f&u=https://seagrant.sunysb.edu/articles/r/12973

North Rose Wolcott High School Takes 1st place in 2019 Wayne County Envirothon

Congratulations to the North Rose Wolcott High School team for taking first place in the 2019 Wayne County Envirothon. The team was led by teacher and environmental enthusiast Mr. Nick Wojieck. The team members included:  Bella DeFeo, Lucy Zhang, Shea Shattuck, Kennedy Jones, Phil Ufholz, and Jacob Smith. This was the third year North-Rose Wolcott had competed.

This year, the Montezuma Audubon Center in Savannah N.Y. hosted the seven teams. Students competed from four high schools across the Wayne County that included: Wayne Central High School, North Rose-Wolcott HS, Red Creek High School and Wayne Technical and Career Center.

Second place was awarded Red Creek led by their teacher Mr. Terry Elmer, Third Place was awarded to the Red Creek Rams, led by their teacher Mr. Joseph Bonanno with a brand new team for 2019.

After years of rain and snow during past Envirothon competitions, this year was a bright and sunny day at the Montezuma Wildlife Center. Each team consisted of three to five-members. The teams participated in a series of field station tests that focus on five topic areas of conservation– soils and land use, aquatic ecology, forestry, wildlife, a current environmental issue, this year being Agriculture and the Environment: Knowledge and Technology to Feed the World.

In addition to the five field stations, each team must present their solution to a problem related to the current issue to a board of judges.  The population of the Earth is estimated to be approximately 9 billion by the year 2050. One of the primary concerns for the agricultural industry is how will farmers be able to grow enough food to feed this growing population, while also protecting natural resources such as soil, water, air, wildlife, and forestry resources.  Students gave presentations on the concepts of how agriculture and all natural resource areas are interrelated, and how the use of new technologies are key to increase food production. Key topics included:

Understand the importance of moving toward sustainable farming systems to conserve natural resources, mitigate climate change, reduce erosion and protect water quality and quantity, and promote pollination;

Comprehension of farming practices that build soil organic matter such as composting, crop rotations, cover crops, conservation tillage, and management intensive grazing systems to improve soil health;

Understand integrated pest management and biological pest control techniques used to prevent insect pest, disease, and weed problems;

Understand the role of new technology: agricultural biotechnology; precision agriculture; and using UAV (drones, GIS, etc.) to increase farm efficiency for food production.

Envirothon is designed to give students the opportunity to learn about environmental issues and natural resources by conducting tests in the field. Often times this experience becomes a lifestyle for students and goes beyond competitions—it encourages students to be actively engaged in the environment around them at all times. Many students move onto careers in the conservation and environmental fields.

The District couldn’t put on a successful youth conservation program without our many sponsors. Special thanks go to the area businesses that made donations. Their support assisted in the purchase of Envirothon T-shirts, educational prizes and awards. Area sponsors included Wayne Pomona Grange, Lyons National Bank, Lyons Veterinary Clinic, Galens Pharmacy, RoadTek LLC, Wayne County Farm Bureau, Wegmans Newark, Thorpe Vineyard, and Clingerman Taxidermy.  In addition, recognition goes to Montezuma Audubon Center Director Chris Lajewski and the many volunteers at the Center that assisted in the event.

The North Rose Wolcott team will move on to compete at N.Y. State competition held at the Hobart & William Smith Colleges in Geneva, NY on May 22 & 23rd. Good luck and GO TEAM!

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Spring Fish Sale is Underway – Stock your ponds!

Our Spring fish sale is underway.  This year we are offering Flathead minnows, Largemouth Bass, Blue Gill, Catfish, and Black Crappie.  Orders with payment due by Thursday, April 25, 2019

Sterilized Triploid Grass Carp are also available to control aquatic vegetation. 

Sterilized carp that are incapable of producing viable young, is the only form of grass carp legal in NY due to concerns of the potential impact fertile grass carp could have on the ecosystem. Grass carp prefer submergent, tender plant species such as elodea, coontail, fanwort, curly leaf pondweed, and watermilfoil. They will not control emergent plants such as cattail, bulrush or floating plant species such as water lily.

Please include a copy of the approved DEC permit with order

A DEC permit is required before you can buy and stock grass carp in your pond. The permit form is available from the NYS DEC at http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/wildlife_pdf/grasscarpstockap.pdf, or you can call our office and we can mail a copy. The permit should be completed and sent to DEC at least three weeks before our sale to ensure you receive your permit before our deadline.

How to Order

1. Order through our online store (click here)

2. Print and mail a check (click here)

3. Call 315-946-7200 and order by phone

This year pickup will be at our NEW LOCATION 7312 RT 31 Lyons, NY 14489 (just behind the Sheriff Offices.) Thursday May 2nd – 5-6 P.M.

When picking up your fish pond owners should bring their own transport containers. Call Chris at 315-946-7200 with any questions.

2019 Forever Green Tree and Shrub Sale Underway

Our annual Forever Green Tree & Shrub sale will be hosted at our new offices located at 7312 Rt. 31 in Lyons.

All seedlings are bare root stock.   Consult our catalog for a detailed description of what a bare root plant is. The stock may be used for wildlife habitat, erosion control, reforestation, windbreaks, landscaping, Christmas trees, etc. All trees and shrubs sold are to be used for these conservation practices. Trees and shrubs are sold with the understanding that they will not be removed from the planted site for resale with the roots attached. Orders are filled on a  first-come, first-serve basis.  The District reserves the right to refund payment on items if they should become unavailable. The District will NOT be responsible for the success or failure of plantings.

Three ways to order:

Order with payment due: 
Monday March 18th 2019
** Mail ORDER to: **
** 7312 Rt-31. Lyons, NY 14489 ** Checks to be made out to: Wayne County SWCD

 

PICKUP DATES & TIMES
Wed. April 24th, 12:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Thurs. April 25th, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
Fri. April 26th, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
Leftovers Plants will be sold: Mon. April 29th 8:00 am—5:00 pm

PICKUP LOCATION
7312 Rt-31. Lyons, NY 14489

Additional Resources

Spotted Lantern Fly

Spotted Lantern Fly

A single adult Spotted Lantern Fly was discovered in a vehicle in the Albany District. In addition, a single adult insect was reported on a private Keuka Lake property in Penn Yan, Yates County.

The state departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today confirmed that spotted lanternfly (SLF), has been found in Albany and Yates counties. At this time, no additional insects have been found. DEC and DAM urge New Yorkers to report potential sightings to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov

FACT SHEETS:

  • NYS DEC Spotted Lantern Fly Fact Sheet
    ID VIDEO:

  • N.Y. health officials warn of new species of tick

    This undated photo provided by Rutgers University shows three Longhorned ticks: from left, a fully engorged female, a partial engorged female, and an engorged nymph. A hardy, invasive species of tick that survived a New Jersey winter and subsequently traversed the mid-Atlantic has mysteriously arrived in Arkansas. No one is sure how the Longhorned tick, native to East Asia, arrived in the country, nor how it made its way to the middle of the continent. (Jim Occi/Rutgers University via AP)

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Public health and agriculture officials are warning New York residents, farms and visitors to take precautions outdoors as a new tick species has been found in the state.

    The Departments of Health and Agriculture and Markets issued a warning Tuesday for an insect commonly known as the “longhorned tick,” which was recently discovered in multiple locations in Westchester County.

    Health experts worked with researchers at Fordham University in the Bronx and at New York Medical College to identify the new species. The identifications were confirmed by researchers at Rutgers University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

    Officials say the tick can also pose a threat to livestock. The tick is native to the Pacific region but has been found recently in New Jersey, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina and Arkansas.

    Water Chestnut Competition

    The District will be offering it’s first water chestnut hand will competition. July 21st and Bay Bridge South (Lake Shore Marshes). Water Chestnut Warrior teams of 4  will compete in 3 different events – a short pull, long pull and a bag fill – to see how quickly and efficiently they can work to remove water chestnuts from the bay! Gift Cards to local restaurants will be awarded to the 1st, 2nd and 3rd place teams and all participants receive a free t-shirt. Registration is $20.00 for team of 4 ($5.00 per person)- Is your team up for the challenge?

    REGISTER YOUR TEAM HERE!

    Help us spread the word, download this poster for distribution

    Annual Report on Conservation across Wayne County

    Over 45,00 acres in Wayne County
    Conservation is a continued tradition to protect heritage of the ecosystem for all living creatures. Legacy is what we leave behind. It is about making sure as a community, what we leave behind the community can be proud of. While being part of an ever changing society, conservation is about protecting habitat for all the life within the community. Many of times, we all are wrapped up in the present and forget to think about what came before us and what will come after us.

    Read More Here

    Nesting Boxes and More ..

    nesting_boxesAs winter wanes and our thoughts turn to springtime, it’s time to think about nesting boxes for birds.  Many cavity nesting birds scout out and select nest sites starting in late February through May, so now is the time to begin making preparations.

    Nesting boxes are available year round.

    Order Online here

    Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District
    7312 RT 31 Lyons, NY 14489
    315-946-7200