Our Pond Stocking fish sale has come to a close, thank you for your orders.

Pick up in Lyons on Thursday, May 12th from 4-5p.m. at the District’s office 7312 Route 31, Lyons NY 14489

When you pick up your fish, we recommend a large cooler or clean garbage can with lid filled with at least 15-20 gallons of water from your pond. Do not use chlorinated water to transport your fish. Bring at least 20 gallons of pond water for every 6 Grass Carp, 30 Catfish, 500 Minnows, 100 Bass or 100 Perch for a travel time of 30-45 minutes. Please bring a cover for the containers, so the water does not splash around and the fish do not jump or splash out. A garbage bag with a tie in the container works well.

Any questions, please call 315-946-7200

International Joint Commission (IJC) Seeking Comments on Phase I Review of Water Levels Plan

The Great Lakes Adaptive Management (GLAM) Committee has completed its Phase I review of Plan 2014, the plan for regulating Lake Ontario outflows. The Plan went into effect in 2017 and was preceded by extremely wet conditions, causing significant flooding impacts to both US and Canadian communities. In response to public concerns, the IJC asked the GLAM Committee to launch an expedited review.

There are two review phases, the first phase focused on providing information to the IJC’s International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board (ILOSLRB) during this ongoing period of near-record high inflows from Lake Erie. It analyzed the impact of high water levels on shoreline homes, marinas, commercial shippers and more. Early results in 2020 helped the ILOSLRB set Lake Ontario outflows more effectively in the spring of that year. The full review of Phase I is now complete and available for public comment.

Comments can be submitted on the IJC’s website until April 14, visit www.GLAM-Engage.ijc.org

Read the Report

The second phase will address extreme high and low water levels over the longer term. In this phase the GLAM Committee will advise the ILOSLRB on whether adjustments to the plan might make sense, not just for the current conditions, but overall. That review is expected to be completed by late 2024.

Any changes to Plan 2014 would need to be approved by the IJC and agreed to by the Governments of Canada and the United States.

Free Seedlings Available to Qualified Landowners for Streamside Plantings

The application period for DEC’s Trees for Tribs’ Buffer in a Bag Program is now open. Qualifying private and public landowners may apply for a free bag of 25 tree and shrub seedlings for planting near streams, rivers, or lakes to help stabilize banks, protect water quality, and improve wildlife habitat.

To qualify, landowners must have property in New York State with at least 50 feet that borders a stream, river, or lake, and provide photos or a map of the planting location. We encourage previous recipients to reapply to continue building their riparian buffer. Applicants are eligible for one bag of 25 seedlings and recipients are chosen on a first-come, first-served basis.

A total of 350 bags will be available statewide for this round of applications, so apply right away.

Interested applicants can visit DEC’s website for more information about the Buffer in a Bag application process and requirements.  Applications are due by 3:00 p.m. on Monday, April 11th.

Full NYS press release can be found at https://www.dec.ny.gov/press/124734.html

The 2022 Annual Forever Green Tree & Shrub is Underway!

The District offers varieties of low-cost bare root seedlings and transplants, conifers, deciduous trees, bushes and shrubs, fruit plants, conservation packs, habitat boxes, and other products.  All plants are grown by private commercial nurseries, these plants provide an economical source of conservation landscaping materials, windbreaks, and quantities for reforesting. Start here

Conventional deicers can wreak havoc on ecosystems.

With all this snow it’s important to consider water quality when salting driveways and walkways. Most communities send out big trucks that dump loads of salts on roads. Many homeowners will also add salts to sidewalks to keep people safer from slip hazards. Conventional deicers like salts often wash into nearby streams and can create aquatic dead zones that suffocate plant and aquatic life.

Many municipalities are coming up with new methods to melt snow and ice or prevent it from sticking to walkways and roads. Here in Wayne County, sand has proven to be an excellent alternative. There are many options found in the home that contain even more eco-friendly ingredients, including brines, coffee grounds, and even sugar beet juice.

Here are a few:

Alfalfa Meal

Alfalfa meal is mostly used as a fertilizer, but it’s also effective for melting ice. Alfalfa meal has a grainy texture that also offers more traction as you walk. Although a deicer, use this alternative in moderation. Excessive nitrogen can leach into waterways and could lead to algal blooms.

Sugar Beet Juice
Sugar beet juice is a popular ice melt option that lowers the freezing point of ice and helps deicers stick to the ground better. Beet Juice is safe for pets and not corrosive to vehicles. On its own, sugar beet juice isn’t as effective as other deicers, but it does reduce the amount of conventional deicers you would need to clear up walkways. This alternative is gaining traction in Canada. ( read article from Modern Farmer)

Coffee Grounds
Don’t toss those Keurig pods of coffee grounds. These grounds can help with melting ice, plus they add traction to the walkways.

 

Brines
That extra pickle juice in the jar? If you’re not going to drink it, maybe you can use it to clear your frosty sidewalks. In another effort to turn waste into something useful, people have creatively used brines like pickle or cheese brine instead of road salts.

Baking Soda
This alternative works in a similar way to salt. It lowers the freezing point of water when it permeates it, working well in environments that have cold weather, but not extremely cold weather.

Epsom Salt
This is a great option for ice melt because it’s as effective as table salt and rock salt, but it’s much safer to use around plant life. Mix the Epsom salt with some sugar for the best results.

Another consideration is the placement of snow. When piles melt there is a potential for flooding. If your home is on a grade or hill, shovel snow so that it doesn’t roll toward your home when it melts. Always keep drainage areas around your home clear of snow and ice build-up. Make certain to locate snow piles in areas that gradually penetrates into the ground when piles melt. Never shovel snow into a street drain.

Parts of this post were taken from an article written by Paige Bennett from EcoWatch To read the full article visit https://www.ecowatch.com/sustainable-alternatives-winter-salts-2656111075.html

Let us know if you like these posts, feedback is appreciated, email maxine@waynenyswcd.org

Gift Wrapping Ideas

Here are some Gift Wrapping Ideas.
Try the Japanese tradition of furoshiki fabric wraps.

To make it easy, use fabric squares made from machine washable 100% organic cotton that can be reused in a wide variety of ways. Make your own art! Your gift recipients can either re-gift or hang it in their home or office as wall art, use it as a face mask or grocery bag, style it as a scarf, and more. Here is a furoshiki guide to wrapping

Newspaper is another great material that is frequently recommended for wrapping.

Newspapers are printed that morning in the same city and are recyclable, making them more affordable and sustainable than typical wrapping paper. Get creative and buy newspapers from other countries, many bookstores carry these or shop antique stores for print media with memorable dates.

Wrap your presents as usual, but add the twine or ribbon. Grap that gathering bag and collect items like fresh pine cones, beautiful white birch bark, twigs, moss, and greens make your gift extra special. Look in the cupboard for bay leaves and cinnamon sticks. Use floral wire to attach kumquats, holly sprigs.